Author: Online_Editor

“Accio Due Process!” Solving the Due Process Crisis in the Wizarding World of Harry Potter and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Author: Jessica Victoria Hidalgo [1]

Mr. and Mrs. Dursley, of number four, Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much.[2]

Twenty years ago, those few, surprisingly un-magical, first words of the first Harry Potter novel sparked a global phenomenon as a generation of children and young adults fell in love with author J.K. Rowling’s magical world. The phenomenal success of the Harry Potter series is indisputable. Rowling’s seven-book series about a British boy-wizard has sold 400 million copies worldwide,[3] and the Harry Potter franchise includes dozens of short stories, eight Oscar-nominated movies, a sequel Broadway and West End play, four theme parks, toys and merchandise, video games, and, most recently, a prequel film series starting with Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.[4] Continue reading

Five Reasons Louisiana May be the Next State to Repeal Capital Punishment

Author: Sarah M. Lambert*

 Fewer people are being sentenced to death in Louisiana.  Of those who are sentenced to death, even fewer are being executed.  In the past fifteen years, only one person has been executed in Louisiana.  The decline in capital punishment reflects a broader trend throughout the United States and around the world.  Public support for the death penalty is the lowest it has been in forty years, with less than half of Americans now supporting the practice.[1]  Bipartisan support for repealing capital punishment is on the rise across the nation, including in Louisiana.  During the 2017 Regular Legislative Session, Democratic Representative Terry Landry introduced House Bill 101 in Louisiana’s House of Representatives, and Republican Senator Dan Claitor introduced a companion, Bill 142, in the Louisiana Senate.  The overarching goal of both bills was to repeal capital punishment in Louisiana. Continue reading

THUMBS DOWN: THE TROUBLE WITH COMPELLED FINGER PRINT ACCESS TO SMART DEVICES

Author: Reagan Charleston

I. INTRODUCTION

Smart devices have become an extension of ourselves.  Take a walk, sit in the park, ride the subway, go to a restaurant, look around you while you sit in traffic; you will likely find that nearly everyone walks, sits, and drives with their phone in their hand.  Your smartphone likely sits near you as you read this piece.  Even our sleep is effected by our smart phone use.[1]  Today, hand injuries from excessive cell phone use have become commonplace.[2]  We are fixated on our phones, and we do not “unplug” when we get home.[3]  According to a 2014 Civic Science report, the average American spends over twelve hours a day engaged in smart phone use.[4]  We know what it means for our eyes, but what does it mean for our constitutional rights?[5]  Continue reading

Houston Attorney Mr. Brendan P. Doherty Honored By Texas Bar Foundation

Mr. Brendan P. Doherty with Gieger, Laborde & Laperouse, L.L.C. has been elected to membership in the Fellows of the Texas Bar Foundation. Fellows of the Foundation are selected for their outstanding professional achievements and their demonstrated commitment to the improvement of the justice system throughout the state of Texas. Election is a mark of distinction and recognition of Mr. Doherty’s contributions to the legal profession.

Selection as a Fellow of the Texas Bar Foundation is restricted to members of the State Bar of Texas. Each year, one-third of one percent of State Bar members are invited to become Fellows. Once nominees are selected, they must be elected by the Texas Bar Foundation Board of Trustees. Membership has grown from an initial 255 Charter Members in 1965 to more than 9,000 Fellows throughout Texas today.

The Texas Bar Foundation is the largest charitably funded bar foundation in the country. Founded in 1965 by lawyers determined to assist the public and improve the profession of law, the Texas Bar Foundation has maintained its mission of using the financial contributions of its membership to build a strong justice system for all Texans. To date, the Texas Bar Foundation has distributed more than $16 million throughout Texas to assist nonprofit organizations with a wide range of justice-related programs and services. For more information, contact the Texas Bar Foundation at www.txbf.org.

42 U.S.C. § 14141 as a New Method of Prosecutorial Oversight: A Look at Prosecutorial Misconduct in Louisiana

Author: Sarah Lambert

[Prosecutor] Jim Williams tortured me and tried to kill me. By plain definition, I am a victim of torture and attempted murder. My mother, my sons, my grandmother were all victims of that torture. They hurt every day that I was locked in a cell on death row and the State was trying to kill me. Now everyone acts as if nothing happened to us. Is it because our lives don’t matter? No-one has been brought to justice for what happened to me, to the scores of others in Louisiana like me and to the thousands of people around the country who have been exonerated. We are victims, we want the perpetrators held to account and no one is doing it.

–John Thompson[1] Continue reading

Sacrificial Victims: Louisiana’s Flawed Attempt at Protecting Survivors of Domestic Violence from Eviction

Author: Patrick Murphree

Until August 2015, Louisiana landlords could make the summoning of the police or acts of domestic violence on the premises cause for eviction.[1] Domestic violence victims were thus forced to choose between summoning help and losing their homes.[2] In a laudable attempt to remedy this situation, the Louisiana legislature passed a law restricting the ability of landlords to evict victims as a result of their abusers’ actions.[3] Nevertheless, the final act abandoned the promise of the original bill, leaving too many Louisianans without adequate protection of their housing rights in the aftermath of domestic violence. By prioritizing the needs of landlords over those of domestic violence survivors, the legislature values the economic interests of property holders more than the safety of victims.

Continue reading

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